The Many Benefits of Self-Powered GPS Trackers

In today’s fast-paced world, keeping track of valuable assets, loved ones, or even pets is essential for peace of mind and security. A self-powered GPS tracker offers a versatile and reliable …

5 Things to Consider When Buying Gooseneck Livestock Trailers

When purchasing a gooseneck livestock trailer, there are several key considerations to ensure that you select a suitable option for safely transporting your animals. Here are five essential factors to keep …

What Can a Crane Rental Be Used For?

Crane rentals are an integral part of many construction projects and industrial operations. These powerful machines are not just about lifting heavy loads but also about providing flexibility and efficiency in …

goat-671812_1280

O’Hare International Airport is getting some much-needed landscaping from some surprising workers: a herd of goats, sheep, llamas, alpacas and burros that tend to six acres on the other side of the fence from where the planes land.

The Sustainable Vegetation Management Initiative, now in its third year, has been quite a success.

The landscaping program is an efficient way of removing hard-to-access vegetation, which in turn eliminates the habitat for wildlife that could interfere with airport operations (including birds, which can be prove dangerous to planes, especially when concentrated in large numbers). It provides an alternative to simply spraying with toxic herbicides, and reduces soil erosion by eliminating the need for heavy equipment in the area. Plus, it reduces both the cost and pollution associated with gas-powered mowers, trimmers and other lawn equipment.

By having a mixed herd of over 40 grazers, including several types of animals with different tastes, almost all the different types of invasive plants are eaten. Even poison ivy can be cleared with no ill effects on the grazers.

The animals take plenty of breaks, human workers have confirmed. The four-legged workers seem content, and there haven’t been any demands for wage hikes.

“They don’t charge any overtime,” Aviation Commissioner Ginger Evans, visiting the herd on Aug. 4, told ABC News. “No, they just nibble away.”

Are these hooved landscapers poised to take over the jobs of the 888,426 people working for the nation’s approximately 401,473 landscaping businesses? It’s unlikely. But more and more management teams of both private spaces and municipal areas are seeing the benefit of involving four-legged friends in clearing efforts. The Boston Globe reported earlier this summer that Boston, too, would be expanding its use of goat-driven landscaping — noting that last year, the goats “didn’t do such a baaa-d job” of clearing overgrown city land.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *